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This mining town was built in 1881 by George Caperton alongside the main line of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. Caperton was later president of The New River Company. The orgininal name of the town was "Mincar." Around 1900 Queen Victoria allegedly owned the Caperton operation to provide coal for England (under the name Victoria Coal Coke). Sewell Colliery Co. owned the mine in the teens and they called the mine "Sugar Camp." However, the mine closed in the '40s or '50s. The school for white children was closed in 1952, the post office in 1954, and the town was abandoned shortly thereafter.

Photos and story courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com

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The Capertons'
Boardinghouse
Boardinghouse
This Structure was possibly a Boarding house. Still standing (though barely) in 1987. Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
Boardinghouse
Coke Oven Detail
Coke Oven Detail
Detail of the Caperton Coke Ovens. Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
Coke Oven Detail
Coke Oven
Coke Oven
Caperton Coke Ovens. Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
Coke Oven
Hoist
Hoist
The Monitor Car Hoist at the top of the incline. Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
Hoist
Hoist Detail
Hoist Detail
The Monitor Car Hoist, looking down the incline. Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
Hoist Detail
mansion
mansion
The ruins of the Caperton mansion. It stood until a tree fell across it in 1984. It was located at the end of the swinging bridge that connected Caperton and Elverton. Courtesy www.coalcampusa.com
mansion
monitor
monitor
A monitor car is still dangling from the cable across the tipple ruins. Photo Courtesy of www.coalcampusa.com
monitor
George Caperton
George Caperton
George Caperton on the Left at the Powerhouse of the Thurmond Coal Company, 1876 Photo Courtesy of West Virginia and Regional History Collection, West Virginia University Libraries.
George Caperton
Tipple
Tipple
The cut stone foundations for the tipple are terraced into the mountainside. Photo Courtesy www.coalcampusa.com
Tipple
 
 
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